I can find no grounds for optimism on the economy

All the signs are there that a recession is just around the corner – but who will admit it? In any other world there would be national soul searching. Britain’s economic growth rate over the past 12 months is half its average over the previous 25 years – and set to deteriorate further.

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Owen Jones: ‘Build more houses!’: the radical 1968 posters that are no less relevant today

The Poster Workshop was a facility used by activists in the late 1960s. A new book about it shows that while the left can now campaign more easily, the issues are sadly all too similar

It was an era with echoes of our own: a burgeoning radical left that particularly inspired the young; a time of political tumult, with anger over domestic injustices such as housing as well as a bloody foreign policy. The late 1960s saw the fag-end of the second majority Labour government, one that had disillusioned the left with its lack of economic radicalism and its support for the US-led Vietnam war.

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John Naughton: Facebook’s global monopoly poses a deadly threat in developing nations | John Naughton

The social network has played a key role in enabling the spread of fake news in Myanmar and Sri Lanka, studies show, and fuelling murderous violence

The most significant moment in the US Senate’s interrogation of Mark Zuckerberg came when Senator Lindsey Graham asked the Facebook boss: “Who’s your biggest competitor?” It was one of the few moments in his five-hour testimony when Zuckerberg seemed genuinely discombobulated. The video of the exchange is worth watching. First, he smirks. Then he waffles about Google, Apple, Amazon and Microsoft “overlapping” with Facebook in various ways. It’s doesn’t look like he believes what he’s saying.

Eventually, Senator Graham cuts to the chase and asks Zuckerberg if he thinks Facebook is a monopoly. “It certainly doesn’t feel like that to me,” the lad replies.

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Owen Jones: Trump can come. But let him know Britain won’t stand for his bigotry | Owen Jones

The president’s visit should not be a means to normalise his ugly politics. He must be greeted by mass street protests

The normalisation of racism, bigotry and misogyny: this has always been one of the principal dangers of Donald Trump. Here is a man who described Mexicans as rapists and criminals and claimed a judge was biased against him because of his “Mexican heritage”. He has bragged of grabbing women’s genitals, faces multiple accusations of harassment and assault, describes women as “pigs” and “dogs”, and once suggested imprisoning women who had abortions.

Related: Donald Trump to meet Queen on UK visit in July

The ascendant Jacob Rees-Mogg faction of the Tory party brims with those who would emulate Trump if they could

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