GIITTV: EXCLUSIVE: JENN VIX ‘Unlocked’ EP Premiere

JENN VIX is known for collaborating with two members of The Cure, Tin Machine and the bands for David Bowie and Iggy Pop. But the new cinematic single ‘Unlocked‘, unveiled just ahead of the release of the EP by the same name features the original PSYCHEDELIC FURS’ guitarist JOHN ASHTON (the third time they have collaborated). The full EP ‘Unlocked’ is released today and we have the premiere listen here:

http://ift.tt/2yXfL4A

“Jenn’s haunting voice draws you in immediately and possesses a vulnerability that feels genuine,” says John Ashton. “Her music is where minimalist groove electronica meets gritty rock guitar and melodic bass, which for me, is far from a bad neighborhood to be hanging around in. It’s dark and vibey.”

This five-track release sees Vix at her best. With weighty lyrics surrounding personally challenging experiences, her vocal delivery on ‘Complicated Man’ has earned her comparisons to Shirley Manson of Garbage.

I wanted to explore different sounds, and it felt good to do so. After my illness, it took me a year and a half to be able to even listen to music again. Change is scary, but it can also be refreshing. I recently had to burn a few bridges, but they say that the brightest light can come from the bridges you burn. I agree,” explains Jenn Vix.

The ‘Unlocked’ EP is available on the usual streaming and store platforms, but is already available for pre-order on Jenn Vix’s Bandcamp at http://ift.tt/2hRkwBV

TRACK LIST
1. Alive Again
2. Complicated Man
3. Nerve
4. Complicated Man (Into The Veldt Mix) by Danny C. Chavis
5. Unlocked

The post EXCLUSIVE: JENN VIX ‘Unlocked’ EP Premiere appeared first on God Is In The TV.

Advertisements

GIITTV: St. Vincent – MASSEDUCTION (Loma Vista)

MASSEDUCTION arrives 10 years after St.Vincent’s (Annie Clark’s) enchanting debut, Marry Me. She’s spent the last decade evolving by mixing sweet melodies against her new wave and art rock leanings.She’s positioned herself at the centre of inventive songs that burst with ideas and expansive production. She always finds beauty amongst chaos, which can be traced back to Marry Me’s, ‘Your Lips Are Red’. After a chaotic three minutes of clashing drums and abrasive guitars, she strips everything away, delicately repeating the refrain, “your skin’s so fair it’s not fair”. On Masseduction, Clark has found new ways to communicate these deep contrasts in tone and mood. She also explores new themes and goes further emotionally than before, making a record that rivals her best work.

The three preceding singles kept people guessing about the album’s direction and showed Clark’s confidence in displaying her chameleon-like character,. A song referencing New York isn’t the most original idea, yet the yearning first single, ‘New York’, is one of her most moving and direct love songs. It has the same tenderness of previous career highs, ‘I Prefer Your Love’ and ‘Just The Same But Brand New’. The weary sadness in her voice as she sings, “I have lost a hero, I have lost a friend, but for you, darling, I’d do it all again” is heartbreaking — in the best possible way. It begins as a graceful piano ballad and then it introduces gorgeously orchestrated gentle beats and synths . It ends at 2.30, and it’s all too brief.

Los Ageless’ sees the return of her trademark scuzzy guitar playing. The guitars squeal and add textures to the pulsing synths in the verse. In the chorus she lets out an impassioned cry of, “how can any have you and lose you and not lose their minds too?”. Third single, ‘Pills’ has Clark indulging her kitsch side, where she pushes the unhinged nursery-rhyme style to an annoyingly addictive effect:, “pills to wake, pills to sleep, pills pills pills, every day of the week”.Pills’ eventually breaks down with a glorious prog-induced coda that would fit on At War With The Mystics by The Flaming Lips. There are shades of Bowie as a sleepy saxophone appears through the haze, which is a sharp contrast to the schizophrenic first half.

It’s admirable that Clark finds new ways to flesh out her ideas as she pushes her music sonically in bold directions. It never overshadows how strong the songwriting is, as Clark sounds firmly in control. ‘Sugarboy’ begins with backing vocals that recall The Chap, before a fast electronic beat comes in sounding somewhere between, ‘I Feel Love’ and ‘Ray Of Light’ (and it’s as good as that sounds). She plays with gender in a way that Prince often did as she sings, “boys I am a lot like you, girls I am a lot like you”. His influence is all over the slinky R&B of ‘Saviour’ where sexual desires are featured heavily. They reappear on the title track as she repeats, “I don’t turn off what turns me on”.

Along with, ‘New York’, the ballads provide some of the most striking moments. ‘Happy Birthday Johnny’ is a reflective call-back to ‘Prince Johnny’ and ‘Marry Me’, and it’s just as gorgeous. The simple piano backdrop is a perfect complement to the tragic tale of her struggling friend. When a slide guitar appears, it’s reminiscent of Susanne Sundfør’s recent masterpiece, Music For People In Trouble. The album highlight, ‘Slow Disco’, is characterised by her soulful vocal and a warm orchestral arrangement that gives MASSEDUCTION its emotional centrepiece.

One of the most striking things about MASSEDUCTION is Clark’s demonstration of impressive vocal versatility. She goes to opposite extremes, sometimes in the same song. For someone who often appears stylised, her humanity is totally exposed. Sometimes she appears defiant and other times she sounds like the complexities of her life are all too much. On the brash pop song  ‘Young Lover’, she ends the song shrieking the title as the dramatic new wave guitars, synths and drums cascade around her. On the excellent 80s-industrial synth-pop inspired ‘Fear Of The Future’, Clark addresses her anxieties with an aptly frantic vocal.

On ‘Smoking Section’, Clark’s voice is raw as if she’s tired from wrestling with thoughts about her relationship. There are hints of a twisted take on Bjork’s ‘Hyperballad’ when she sings, “sometimes I go to the edge of my room, I think I’ll jump just to punish you”.Smoking Section’ closes the album with Clark repeating, “it’s not the end” with more than a hint of Beth Gibbons. It leaves the album on an uncertain note.

In some ways, MASSEDUCTION  isn’t a huge departure from Strange Mercy or St. Vincent — it has the same illuminating production. Her personality and imagination remain her biggest assets, but she never sacrifices her spontaneity. Everything feels bigger and more pronounced, making this her most eclectic and exciting record to date. On the title track she teases, “oh what a bore to be so adored”. She should be used to that, because this exceptional record showcases her formidable talents yet again.

The post St. Vincent – MASSEDUCTION (Loma Vista) appeared first on God Is In The TV.

Owen Jones: British banks can’t be trusted – let’s nationalise them | Owen Jones

Our finance system is rigged in favour of a crisis-ridden City to reap profits for individuals. It’s time these institutions worked for the good of communities

Sometimes the case for a policy is as overwhelming as the level of ridicule it will get from the punditocracy. The nationalisation of Britain’s failed banking industry – the sector responsible for most of our country’s current ills – is one such example. According to a recent poll, half the electorate support nationalising the banks, despite almost no one arguing for such a policy in public life.

It may well be because the banks plunged Britain into one of its worst economic crises in modern history, spawning, according to the Institute for Fiscal Studies, perhaps our worst squeeze in living standards since the 1750s. The fact that they have been bailed out by the taxpayer but allowed to carry on as though little happened – including more top British bankers in 2013 being gifted bonuses worth over €1m than all EU countries combined – while public services are gratuitously slashed, has rightly riled some British voters.

Related: Labour demands review into City of London role in money-laundering

Related: Half of UK adults are financially vulnerable, City watchdog finds

Continue reading…

GIITTV: St. Vincent – Masseducation (Loma Vista)

Masseduction arrives 10 years after St.Vincent’s (Annie Clark’s) enchanting debut, Marry Me. She’s spent the last decade evolving by mixing sweet melodies against her new wave and art rock leanings.She’s positioned herself at the centre of inventive songs that burst with ideas and expansive production. She always finds beauty amongst chaos, which can be traced back to Marry Me’s, ‘Your Lips Are Red’. After a chaotic three minutes of clashing drums and abrasive guitars, she strips everything away, delicately repeating the refrain, “your skin’s so fair it’s not fair”. On Masseduction, Clark has found new ways to communicate these deep contrasts in tone and mood. She also explores new themes and goes further emotionally than before, making a record that rivals her best work.

 

The three preceding singles kept people guessing about the album’s direction and showed Clark’s confidence in displaying her chameleon-like character,. A song referencing New York isn’t the most original idea, yet the yearning first single, ‘New York’, is one of her most moving and direct love songs. It has the same tenderness of previous career highs, ‘I Prefer Your Love’ and ‘Just The Same But Brand New’. The weary sadness in her voice as she sings, “I have lost a hero, I have lost a friend, but for you, darling, I’d do it all again” is heartbreaking — in the best possible way. It begins as a graceful piano ballad and then it introduces gorgeously orchestrated gentle beats and synths . It ends at 2.30, and it’s all too brief.

 

Los Ageless’ sees the return of her trademark scuzzy guitar playing. The guitars squeal and add textures to the pulsing synths in the verse. In the chorus she lets out an impassioned cry of, “how can any have you and lose you and not lose their minds too?”. Third single, ‘Pills’ has Clark indulging her kitsch side, where she pushes the unhinged nursery-rhyme style to an annoyingly addictive effect:, “pills to wake, pills to sleep, pills pills pills, every day of the week”.Pills’ eventually breaks down with a glorious prog-induced coda that would fit on At War With The Mystics by The Flaming Lips. There are shades of Bowie as a sleepy saxophone appears through the haze, which is a sharp contrast to the schizophrenic first half.

 

It’s admirable that Clark finds new ways to flesh out her ideas as she pushes her music sonically in bold directions. It never overshadows how strong the songwriting is, as Clark sounds firmly in control. ‘Sugarboy’ begins with backing vocals that recall The Chap, before a fast electronic beat comes in sounding somewhere between, ‘I Feel Love’ and ‘Ray Of Light’ (and it’s as good as that sounds). She plays with gender in a way that Prince often did as she sings, “boys I am a lot like you, girls I am a lot like you”. His influence is all over the slinky R&B of ‘Saviour’ where sexual desires are featured heavily. They reappear on the title track as she repeats, “I don’t turn off what turns me on”.

 

Along with, ‘New York’, the ballads provide some of the most striking moments. ‘Happy Birthday Johnny’ is a reflective call-back to ‘Prince Johnny’ and ‘Marry Me’, and it’s just as gorgeous. The simple piano backdrop is a perfect complement to the tragic tale of her struggling friend. When a slide guitar appears, it’s reminiscent of Susanne Sundfør’s recent masterpiece, Music For People In Trouble. The album highlight, ‘Slow Disco’, is characterised by her soulful vocal and a warm orchestral arrangement that gives Masseduction its emotional centrepiece.

 

One of the most striking things about Masseduction is Clark’s demonstration of impressive vocal versatility. She goes to opposite extremes, sometimes in the same song. For someone who often appears stylised, her humanity is totally exposed. Sometimes she appears defiant and other times she sounds like the complexities of her life are all too much. On the brash pop song  ‘Young Lover’, she ends the song shrieking the title as the dramatic new wave guitars, synths and drums cascade around her. On the excellent 80s-industrial synth-pop inspired ‘Fear Of The Future’, Clark addresses her anxieties with an aptly frantic vocal.

 

On ‘Smoking Section’, Clark’s voice is raw as if she’s tired from wrestling with thoughts about her relationship. There are hints of a twisted take on Bjork’s ‘Hyperballad’ when she sings, “sometimes I go to the edge of my room, I think I’ll jump just to punish you”.Smoking Section’ closes the album with Clark repeating, “it’s not the end” with more than a hint of Beth Gibbons. It leaves the album on an uncertain note.

 

In some ways, Masseduction isn’t a huge departure from Strange Mercy or St. Vincent — it has the same illuminating production. Her personality and imagination remain her biggest assets, but she never sacrifices her spontaneity. Everything feels bigger and more pronounced, making this her most eclectic and exciting record to date. On the title track she teases, “oh what a bore to be so adored”. She should be used to that, because this exceptional record showcases her formidable talents yet again.

The post St. Vincent – Masseducation (Loma Vista) appeared first on God Is In The TV.

GIITTV: Sløtface – The Cookie, Leicester – 17/10/2017

Expectation (noun) – the act or state of looking forward or anticipating.

Last month, I showered Sløtface with semi-passionate plaudits for their debut album Try Not To Freak Out. I did so whilst sitting in a bar in downtown Bruges and the 8.5% Belgian craft beer may have been partly responsible for the phrase “…an untamed romp through the sun-soaked folly of youth.” Nonetheless, this bunch of Norwegian miscreants have been tearing it up across the country recently, or at least that’s what their Facebook page claims and having lived with many of their punchy, vivacious reminiscences for a few months, I find myself in a state of mild excitement. Trust me, this isn’t the norm; I’m actually a miserable sod at heart.

However, four numbers in and my spider-sense is telling me something just doesn’t quite feel right, perhaps it was the calamari I scoffed just beforehand or is it something more rudimentary? After all, the band have wasted little time in warming the sparse audience with better known numbers such as ‘Magazine’ and the infectious ear-worm that is ‘Pitted’ and yet I am still in a state of puzzlement. Then it hits me like a Perseid meteor shower, the problem with Sløtface is that they are just too damn professional. This is a band who ought to be the very antithsesis of the oil town from which they hail (Stavanger), they should be loud, raucous and shambolic but instead they are politeness personified, more in keeping with Harlow with which Stavanger is twinned.

Don’t get me wrong, I’m not disappointed, just a bit surprised the band are halfway through their 45 minute set with the hand brake still on. I am desperate for them to cut loose, shout a few obsenities and maybe, just maybe, launch themselves with wanton abandonment into the crowd. But no, we are encouraged to sing Happy Birthday to one of the crew and I’m starting to wonder whether my daughters’ 5th birthday party wasn’t wilder than this.

Then, as if by magic, they tear through ‘Sun Bleached’ and the shackles start to be shed. The fact this wasn’t a Summer blockbuster still rankles with me but by now we’re moving through the gears, culminating in a mad dash through ‘Empire Records’ which, scandalously, was omitted from the album. Sløtface are finally cooking with gas and I’m left to contemplate quite why the reserved bunch of misfits from 15 minutes ago are now happily bouncing around with the rest of us without a care in the world. For the next 15 minutes we are all young again; we’re all free.

Oddly, ‘Slumber’ comes across as possibly the track of the night with some soothing harmonies in amongst the rambunctiousness and the omnipresent ‘Nancy Drew’ reminds me just what appealed to me about Sløtface to begin with; that sense of mischief coupled with an ear for a great anthemic chorus and judging by the amount of inane gurning on the way out, the general populace appear to have had a fine night of entertainment,

I stick by my original summation of Sløtface, they ooze fun and I hope their ambition never compromises their sense of youthful exuberence; I just want them to let go of their inhibitions more or perhaps it’s just me and my excessively high expectations. As Confucius sagely noted “The expectations of life depend upon diligence; the mechanic that would perfect his work must first sharpen his tools”.

Or to paraphrase “Patti Smith would never put up with this shit”

The post Sløtface – The Cookie, Leicester – 17/10/2017 appeared first on God Is In The TV.

GIITTV: The Breeders/PINS – Glasgow O2 ABC – 17/10/2017

It’s no exaggeration to say that there’s a real sense of expectation in the air at the ABC tonight. The Breeders earned the status of cult band many years ago – but perhaps due to the fact that releases have been occasional rather than constant (just four albums in the space of 27 years) – the sense of awe and wonder about those releases or tours mean that the start of their European tour is a big deal for those present.

First up, though, are support band PINS. The best bands have a sense of being a gang, and these five Mancunian lasses definitely more than have that air about them. Opening with last year’s single ‘Trouble‘ (you can pick it up on the merch stand on cassette – it’s the first time I’ve bought a cassette single in many years, but then I’m not a hipster), with its goth groove it makes sense that they are signed to Bella Union, the label helmed by former Cocteau Twins Robin Guthrie and Simon Raymonde. There’s a danceability with a krautrock influence here that is enticing and tracks like the current single ‘Serve The Rich‘ suggest they can progress yet further.

As we wait for our headliners, the t-shirts on display (on the punters rather than the merch stand) – Sub Pop, grunge, indie – give a sense of where The Breeders first came from. Lead by Kim Deal, they were once talked about as being the ultimate indie supergroup. When the band debuted with the Pod album, back in 1990, she was the bassist and singer in the Pixies, a band who should need no introduction. Yet the Breeders took on a life of their own. Their second album, Last Splash, released in 1993 in the aftermath of her supposed day job’s breakup, sold over a million. It’s the line-up that made that record – Deal, her twin sister Kelley on guitar and vocals, Josephine Wiggs on bass and drummer Jim MacPherson – that are here tonight.

“We’re The Breeders from Dayton, Ohio” announces Kim as the band come on stage. “We’ve got a Scottish tour manager” Kelley informs us, “I can’t understand a fucking thing he says!” It must be working though, because despite a few nerves, they give us a near on two-hour set.

There had been rumours of new songs for years – but that aforementioned merch stand is where you can get the first new music in eight years: a 7″ single containing the new song ‘Wait In The Car.’ This is prime Kim Deal, barely more than two minutes long, a song to make you want to punch the air. This gets a warm reception – and its b-side, a cover of Amon Düül II‘s ‘Archangel’s Thunderbird‘ also goes down well in the set.

There may be a few bum notes throughout the set, but the crowd is hyped up and prepared to forgive them anything. Patient when instrument changes take a while – it somehow seems not to matter. After all, with the set list drawing right across their career, how could it? When Kelley was in rehab in 1995, Kim had her own band The Amps; the single ‘Tipp City ‘ from their only album Pacer gets an airing tonight. Perhaps inevitably, the biggest cheer is for ‘Cannonball‘ – the single that lead Last Splash into seven figures of sales. Yet it’s far from being the only song the crowd knows. From Pod we get ‘Fortunately Gone‘ and their cover of The Beatles‘ ‘Happiness Is A Warm Gun.’ Across the years we get ‘No Aloha,’ ‘Off You‘ and ‘Do You Love Me Now?’

When they come back on for a rapturously received encore, they start off with ‘Gigantic,’ the Pixies song written and sung by Kim that showed there was more to that band than just Black Francis. There have been people yelling for ‘Saints‘ all night, and when they finish with that and ‘Iris‘ it brings home just how fantastic The Breeders are. Crowd pleasing? Sure – but when most people are struggling to get by financially, why is that a bad thing? Above all, this gig serves as a reminder as to why their return was so anticipated. There are two more 7″ singles mooted – how many more excuses do you need to catch them live?

The post The Breeders/PINS – Glasgow O2 ABC – 17/10/2017 appeared first on God Is In The TV.

GIITTV: NEWS: Lowly share new video ‘No Hands’

Lowly return to the UK for the fourth time in a year to play a number of headlining shows. To coincide with the live dates, Danes Lowly have shared the new video for “No Hands” which is lifted from their excellent debut LP Heba which came out earlier in the year.

It features a dance performance titled “(S)kjønn Safari”, performed by Louis Schou-Hansen & Harald Andreas Beharie that explores the idea of gender neutrality/ the possibility of creating a third gender. Lowly said this about the video:

We are very honored to have been given permission to use (S)kjønn Safari as the visuals for No Hands. In the video there is an intense and restless struggle between attraction and revulsion between two people that seem to be both in need of each other but and tearing each other down. That makes the piece beautiful and devastating at the same time, the same goes for the song itself and what it seems to be telling
The core of the song is this ambivalence and perhaps why we thought it fitted so well with Louis’ and Harald’s performance.”

UK dates;

24th Nov – BRIGHTON – The Hope & Ruin
25th Nov – LONDON – Omeara
26th Nov – LEEDS – Oporto
27th Nov – LANCASTER – Lancaster Library
28th Nov – MANCHESTER – Castle Hotel

The post NEWS: Lowly share new video ‘No Hands’ appeared first on God Is In The TV.