Jennifer Arcuri turns Johnson heartbreak into comedy horror | Marina Hyde

She says she’s kept his secrets and he’s treated her like a gremlin. Could she be dangerous to the PM?

On the day Boris Johnson addressed the CBI, it’s great to get a firmer idea of what he meant when he said “fuck business”. And who better to give it to us than the CEO of one of the businesses he will surely end up completely fucking. Yes, it’s time to hear a whole lot more from our favourite cray-cray multihyphenate, the model/entrepreneur/infosec-something Jennifer Arcuri. Finally, a proper sublebrity enters the election campaign, as Jennifer breaks six weeks of silence with an ITV special, a Good Morning Britain appearance and a mesmerising Victoria Derbyshire interview in which she declared: “No one’s understood Boris Johnson better than I have for the last 10 years.”

So tell us about the man behind the man. He’s “deep”, revealed Arcuri, not “shallow as a paddling pool”. Right. A “very considerate person”. Also, “a man of his word”. Go on. “He saw my arc, he saw my progression as a woman graduating and becoming a mature entrepreneur.” Any more? “He liked my events. He enjoyed coming. You know, he really did like Innotech.”

Related: Johnson-Arcuri investigation to review affair with another woman

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John Naughton: Can the planet really afford the exorbitant power demands of machine learning? | John Naughton

The environmental impact of such technological advances can be huge

There is, alas, no such thing as a free lunch. This simple and obvious truth is invariably forgotten whenever irrational exuberance teams up with digital technology in the latest quest to “change the world”. A case in point was the bitcoin frenzy, where one could apparently become insanely rich by “mining” for the elusive coins. All you needed was to get a computer to solve a complicated mathematical puzzle and – lo! – you could earn one bitcoin, which at the height of the frenzy was worth $19,783.06. All you had to do was buy a mining kit (or three) from Amazon, plug it in and become part of the crypto future.

The only problem was that mining became progressively more difficult the closer we got to the maximum number of bitcoins set by the scheme and so more and more computing power was required. Which meant that increasing amounts of electrical power were needed to drive the kit. Exactly how much is difficult to calculate, but one estimate published in July by the Judge Business School at the University of Cambridge suggested that the global bitcoin network was then consuming more than seven gigwatts of electricity. Over a year, that’s equal to around 64 terawatt-hours (TWh), which is 8 TWh more than Switzerland uses annually. So each of those magical virtual coins turns out to have a heavy environmental footprint.

When you’ve embarked on changing the world, why let pedantic reservations get in the way?

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